Pacific Journalism Review masthead

Vol 6 No 1, January 2000

Contents

This edition is the second published at the University of the South Pacific. Feedback to The Editor - subscription orders to journ@usp.ac.fj, or fill in the subscription order coupon on this site.

Mark Davis
Australian journalist Mark Davis and Kelly Kwalik in West Papua (Irian Jaya).
ABC Four Corners photo

Editorial: Millennium mayhem

Articles

    EAST TIMOR AND WEST PAPUA:
  • 1 BLOOD ON THE CROSS
    By Mark Davis
    An ABC Four Corners team investigates allegations about the role of the International Red Cross and the British military in a massacre in the Southern Highlands of Irian Jaya during May 1996. The text of the controversial programme which won Davis a 1999 Walkley Award.

  • DUTCH ROLE IN THE HOSTAGE CRISIS
    By Paul Brouwer

  • 2 SANDLINE'S MERCENARIES HELPED KOPASSUS
    By Peter Cronau
    Mercenaries expelled from Papua New Guinea in 1997 had worked a year earlier in West Papua assisting Indonesia's notorious Kopassus special forces troops in an operation that caused many civilian deaths.

  • 3 RUNNING SCARED - HOW THE MEDIA LEFT DILI
    By Liam Phelan
    'The militia men shot up the front of Dili's Hotel Mahkota. The message was clear - get out while you can. This act was enough to trigger the vast majority of the remaining journalists to leave.'

  • 4 REBUILDING THE PRESS
    By Sonny Inbaraj
    'Journalism in East Timor now, in the absence of oppression and repression, calls for a new way of looking at things and a new way of writing. But vbecause it is more difficult to do, our journalists need better training. We must be honest, fair, accurate and not swing madly at the bad guys.'

    OCEANIA PRESS COUNCILS:

  • 1 FAIRNESS, BALANCE AND THE PACIFIC MEDIA
    By David Robie
    Five Pacific papers were presented at the inaugural World Association of Press Councils' Oceania regional conference in Brisbane in June 1999. The first was an overview of the region. (Published in PJR was an abstract only - the link here is to the full article as published in Australian Journalism Review).

  • 2 THE FIJI EXPERIENCE
    By Daryl Tarte
    'The Fiji Media Council is modelled very much on the Australian lines and we frequently draw on Australia for support and expertise. We are outspoken on media independence and freedom of expression yet we seek to work with Government..

  • 3 PNG'S ROCKY ROUTE TO SELF-REGULATION
    By Luke Sela
    'Although we are not properly constituted, the PNG Government does listen to us. We have actually issued our first edict - telling the advertising agencies what to do and when to say it. It is rather an interesting concept.'

  • 4 TONGA AND THE INDEPENDENT PRESS
    By Kalafi Moala
    'This was my first visit to Tonga in three years after I was kicked out of the country and banned ... My "crime"? My newspaper had reported on things that have not given Tonga a good image overseas. So they say ...'

  • 5 GAGGING THE SAMOA OBSERVER
    By Savea Sano Malifa
    'But with a strong electronic media at its disposal, you wonder why the Government wants the private media under its control, as well. The reason is clear enough. The Government does not want the private media to expose acts of corruption.'

  • REPORTING DISEASES IN THE PACIFIC
    By Trevor Cullen
    Heart disease, tuberculosis, STDs and HIV/AIDS have one common feature: they are, with the correct information and application, all preventable diseases. yet, throughout the Pacific, such diseases are on the increase. What should the media do?

  • BROWSING THE PACIFIC
    By Al Hulsen
    A popular wide-ranging Pacific Internet report covers the region. However, it is just one element of a larger journalism project that includes advanced on-the-job training for Pacific Island journalists; and internships for US journalists wanting to learn more about the region.

  • CAFE PACIFIC AND ONLINE CENSORSHIP IN FIJI
    By David Robie
    A commentary on how, more than a decade after the military coups, a hangover from the post-coup 1990 Constitution of Fiji cast a shadow on the media and journalism education methodology in 1998, in spite of the new "free speech" 1997 Constitution.

  • 'NOT IN A PAKEHA COURT': KASTOM AND PACIFIC MEDIA
    By Philip Cass
    Laws which most concern journalists, such as libel, have been framed entirely within a western context. This hinders and often disbars ordinary people from seeking redress against the media in western-style courts. A personal look at ways ordinary citizens might gain satisfaction.

  • A GENUINELY FREE PRESS
    By Ian Ward
    'Journalists need look again at the conventions and practices which conceal their reliance on information subsidies from their audiences. A genuinely free and open press can only exist where readers can recognise where the hand of government has helped in writing the news they read and watch.'

  • PUBLIC BROADCASTING AND THE INTELLIGENT BUTTERFLY
    By Patrick Craddock
    In reality, the public broadcaster has much in common with the butterfly motif used for the title of this article. By settling on the map of community happenings to interview and broadcast what "appears" to be news. But freedom from economic and political pressures and freedom to select what news will be the event of the day are prime elements.

    CHAUDHRY AND THE MEDIA

  • 1 FIJI NEWS MEDIA FACES CRISIS OF ETHICS
    By Mahendra Chaudhry
    In a long-running dispute with the Fiji news media over professionalism, accountability and training ever since the May 1999 general election, this October 1999 speech stirred the controversy to new heights.

  • WAR OF WORDS WITH PUBLISHER
    By Frederica Delailomaloma

  • 2 FIJI TIMES HITS BACK AT PM'S ALLEGATIONS
    By The Fiji Times
    'Most of the Prime Minister's statements consisted of sweeping generalisations or statements of opinion dressed up as fact - ironically, the very sin of which he accused the media.'

  • 3 WHY THE MEDIA MUST REMAIN FREE
    By Daryl Tarte
    'There is absolutely no need for laws to restrict media freedoms. We live in a democratic state and provided the media conforms with its Code of Ethics, it must remain free.'

  • 4 TRANSPARENCY AND THE FIJI NEWS MEDIA
    By Ikbal Jannif
    'Why was there no full text of the Prime Minister's speech published prior to the media starting to defend itself, in the name of media freedom? Why was the public left in the dark, with only snippets to guide it?'.

    PROFILES IN MEDIA:

  • LISALEILANI WILLIAMS
    By Luisa Tora
  • OSEAH PHILEMON
    By Tomasi Raiyawa

Forum

Reviews

  • RADIO HAPPY ISLES: Media and Politics at Play in the Pacific
    By Robert Seward
  • PACIFIC WOMEN SPEAK OUT FOR INDEPENDENCE AND DENUCLEARISATION
    Edited by Zohl de Ishtar
  • A FRAGILE FREEDOM: Challenges Facing the Media in Papua New Guinea
    Edited by Joe Weber
  • ENEMIES WITHIN: Papua New Guinea, Australia and the Sandline Crisis: The Inside Story
    By Mary-Louise O'Callaghan

Index by author


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