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Vol 7 No 1, September 2001

 

Contents

This edition is the third published at the University of the South Pacific. Feedback to The Editor - subscription orders to journ@usp.ac.fj, or fill in the subscription order coupon on this site and email.

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Editorial:

CULTURE AND CONFLICT

Articles

COVERAGE OF CRISES:
1 PARADISE EXPOSED: Is the region's Fourth Estate up to it?
By Mary-Louise O'Callaghan
Should the local press bear some of the responsibility for the political turmoil that has engulfed the South Pacific, asks this article in the first of a series of regional perspectives on crises and how the news media have handled them. Great news is rarely good news for the countries involved. pp 10-19

CHAMPION OF THE FREE PRESS - Ieremia Tabai p 15-18
By Mary-Louise O'Callaghan

2 THE BURE NEWSROOM
By Michael Field
Poolside rumours at the Centra and the media peddling of them had much to answer for in foreign coverage of the Fiji attempted coup. One reporter was an extreme example of the Stockholm Syndrome but others who remained in Parliament day after day also quickly became George Speight's propaganda arm. pp 20-28

3 COPY VERSUS CUSTOM
By Jale Moala
The coup polarised the races in Fiji - or so it seemed, thus creating a situation in which many reporters found it difficult to focus on the issues from a totally impartial point of view. They were swept away by the euphoria of the moment and the tension and the emotion that charged the event. This was true of both indigenous Fijian and Indo-Fijian reporters. pp 29-34

4 MEDIA AND THE COUP
By Samisoni Pareti
Should the local press bear some of the responsibility for the political turmoil that has engulfed the South Pacific, asks this article in the first of a series of regional perspectives on crises and how the news media have handled them. Great news is rarely good news for the countries involved. pp 35-38

THE DAY SITI WAS BATTERED
By Reggie Dutt p 37

5 CONTROVERSIAL CLOSE-UP
Compiled by Alison Ofotalau
Fiji Television's Close-Up programme on 28 May 2000 featured an outspoken media analysis of the insurrection and this led to the attack on the station's studio and offices by a mob of Speight supporters. This is a transcript of the discussion chaired by reporter Riyaz Sayed-Khaiyum and featuring political columnist Jone Dakuvula and Communications Fiji Ltd managing director William Parkinson. pp 39-45

6 FRONTLINE REPORTERS: A students' internet coup
By David Robie
Hours after a mob attacked Fiji Television and cut transmission for almost 48 hours, the University of the South Pacific pulled the plug on the website, fearing a similar raid on the sprawling Laucala campus. Undaunted, the students were offered an alternative site hosted by the Department of Social Communication and Journalism at the University of Technology, Sydney, and carried on unfazed. pp 47-56

7 COUPS AND CONFLICT
By Anthony Mason
Essentially, the Australian media is only interested in covering the Pacific if it involves a coup, a conflict or a natural disaster. The only positive stories are primarily related to tourism. Part of this media attitude towards the Pacific stems from recent history. pp 57-64

8 MEDIA ETHICS IN ELECTIONS
By Richard Naidu
The context of an election makes little difference to the way the journalist practises his or her profession. The basics are all the same. We do not adopt a different set of values because a group of politicians are vying for power. pp 65-68

9 MILITARY EXORCISE GHOSTS
By Ben Bohane
Fijians were at the polls in the final week of August, but with a court martial or rebel soldiers due, Fiji faced not just a divided society but a divided military. pp 69-72

10 PNG'S YEAR OF THE GUN
By Richard Dinnen
All of us who practise journalism in Papua New Guinea need to be ready for challenging times ahead. It is up to Government to properly explain its policies, and that's something the current PNG Government has not done well of late. And it is up to the media to take a leading role in informing, rather than inciting, public debate. pp 73-82

11 ASIA-PACIFIC OVERVIEW
By Kavita Menon
By and large, the press in democratic Asia is threatened less by government action than by government inaction in the face of violent attacks against journalists. Seven Asian journalists were killed for tgheir work in 2000, nearly all of them in countries with an aggressive independent press but weak or politicised law enforcement agencies. pp 83-96

CRISIS OF CONSCIENCE
By Biman Prasad
The University of the South Pacific has become the centre of excellence in the region, as indeed any university of USP's nature should be. Apart from teaching and research, the university has in many ways become the critical conscience of the region. pp 97-104

STUDENT BAPTISM OF FIRE: Reporting the kerosene lamp blasts
By Joe Weber
Student journalists have learned lessons from a spate of deadly kerosene lamp explosions in Madang, Papua New Guinea. The blasts, which killed four people and injured 43 others, provided thew students with an unprecedented opportunity to home newsgathering and writing skills. pp 105-110

CIVIL SOCIETY AND MEDIA: The relevance in Fiji, Tonga and PNG
By David Lea
Papua New Guinea's Melanesian societies contrast with Polynesian societies like Tonga and Samoa, which evolved the familiar authoritarian feudal structures and are always in tension with democratic institutions. In melanesia, those who gain political ascendancy and power must struggle for it. pp 111-117

CARTOONING IN THE PACIFIC

THE SOCIAL CONSTRUCTION OF HUMOUR
By Steven Ratuva
Fiji journalistic cartoons, especially when making political critiques, tend to be too shallow with an irritating tendency to state and show the obvuous, a cardinal sin in cartooning. There is no subtlety or double meaning. pp 119-126

THE UNI TAVUR TESTIMONY

1 'I COULDN'T STOP CRYING'
By Wanita Wakus
It was dubbed Black Tuesday - the night four people were shot dead during protests against World Bank structural adjustment policies in Papua New Guinea. The University of PNG journalism newspaper Uni Tavur published a special edition on 30 July 2001 with several students' accounts of their experience. Here are the stories of two young women. pp 127-128

CHRONOLOGY OF A PROTEST
By Uni Tavur pp 130-133

2 'DEAR MUM AND DAD'
By Estella Cheung
'By sunrise, on this bloody Tuesday, June 26, Port Moresby came under siege. Four people, including two students from the University of PNG, had been shot dead. Their bodies were driven to the Port Moresby General Hospital morgue. Seventeen protesters with pellet wounds were admitted to the hospital's emergency ward.' pp 134-139

TRAUMA AND REPORTERS: And the reporting of suicide in the media
By Anna Shadbolt
Trauma is an inevitable part of everyday life in the Pacific. The media is a powerful force and when used effectively it can help to mobilise assistance for victims and survivors. Sometimes, getting that message across has a psychological cost. pp 140-158

REPORTERS AND THE POLICE: Too close?
By 'Ana Tupueluelu
Criticism about the "homophobic slant" of coverage of the John Scott double murder in Fiji extends to both how Police Commissioner Isikia Savua's statements were reported and how the media used leaked information to "paint a picture, which could not be corroborated". pp 159-163

TALKING THE WRONG TALK?
By Paul Geraghty
If a serious commitment were made to produce a quality Fijian daily, I don't doubt that it would soon outsell all the English ones. Next time anyone in the Fiji media suggests that a major problem today is that the Fijian people are so ill-informed, maybe they should question the Fiji media. pp 164-167

PROFILES IN MEDIA: WAINIKITI WAQA pp 168-170
By Andrea Waqa
TEVITA MOMOEDONU pp 171-174
By Noora Ali
MICHAEL FIELD pp 175-177
By Bernadette Hussain

Reviews

pacjourn cover
THE PACIFIC JOURNALIST: A Practical Guide pp 178-181
Edited by David Robie

NEWSGATHERING ON THE NET pp 182-183
By Stephen Quinn

FIJI WAVES pp 183-184
TV documentary produced/directed by Natalie Gouin

ALL-MEDIA GUIDE TO FAIR AND CROSS-CULTURAL REPORTING pp 185-188
By Stephen Stockwell and Paul Scott

Index by author

 

 

Cover of PJR issue 6:1
Cover of the 2000 edition.




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