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Vol 3 No 2, November 1996

CONTENTS

This edition was assisted with funding by the Communication Assistance Foundation (CAF) of The Netherlands.

Cover of PJR issue

Editorial

Articles

  • THE CONTEMPT CASE OF THE 'TONGAN THREE'
    By David Robie
    Media commentators see the recent jailings of two journalists and an MP whistleblower in Tonga as the most serious threat to media freedom in the South Pacific since the Fiji coups in 1987. But Fiji Prime Minister Sitiveni Rabuka sees the harsh move as a lesson for journalists. Other critics regard the issue as one of a need for greater professionalism.
    Also translated articles by jailed editor Kalafi Moala and MP 'Akilisi Pohiva.

  • WHY ETHICAL JOURNALISTS DESERVE A BETTER CODE
    By Peter Cronau
    As Pacific journalists seek codes of ethics of their own, the new draft Australian code of ethics fails to give journalists and the public confidence. An open and comprehensive process of consultation is needed. The code needs to better protect the right to know.

  • DRAFT AUSTRALIAN CODE OF ETHICS

    THE PAPUA NEW GUINEA MEDIA DEBATE:

  • MEDIA ACCOUNTABILITY AND TECHNOLOGY
    By Sorariba Nash
    Mass media in the Asia-Pacific region need to reexamine their old habits, beliefs and practices and ask: are we meeting the demands of the changing times? Or are we still capable of accommodating these changes? If not, what do we need to do?

  • CURBING THE EXPOSURE OF CROOKED DEALINGS
    By John Gawi
    The only people who think press freedom is a problem are 'crooked politicians' trying to cover up their crooked dealings. Politicians who cannot stand press scrutiny should stay out of public life.

  • THE PNG CONSTITUTION AND THE MEDIA: A JOURNALIST'S VIEW
    By Neville Togarewa
    The PNG Government is trying to 'shoot the messenger'. The danger is that if the Government shoots the messenger today, who will bring them the message they are eagerly looking forward to receiving tomorrow?

  • SECTION 46 - WHY IT WAS INCLUDED
    By John Momis
    The Constitution does not give its citizens any rights or freedoms at all; rather it is a formal recognition, a formal acknowledgement, a formal guarantee, and a formal protection of the citizens innate rights and freedoms.

  • A GRASSROOTS VIEW
    By Joseph Ka'au
    What about the people on the streets and in the jungles? Maybe we should ask the famous Phantom to help us establish a jungle wire service.

  • SIR PETER FIRM ON FREEDOM
    Post-Courier editorial.

  • PRESS FREEDOM, ETHICS AND THE CONSTITUTION
    By David Robie
    Do journalists need to make a stand?As tellers of the truth and watchdogs, do those in the news media need to decide whether they are the agents of power -- or of the people? And how is the journalist's code of ethics upheld? These are crucial questions about freedom of the press.

  • A DAY FOR FREEDOM
    Reporters Sans Frontieres editorial.

  • THE EXPLICIT FREEDOMS IN OUR MODEL DEMOCRACY
    By Sir Rabbie Namaliu
    Liberty isn't like a tap; it isn't something that can be turned on and off at will. Much the same can be said for freedom of speech, including the freedom of the media, and the freedom of citizens to use the media to express their views.

  • SPOTLIGHT ON THE PNG MEDIA
    By Kevin Pamba
    The push by the PNG Government for a 'responsible and accountable' media has put the country's industry in the public spotlight. Several seminars and debates have highlighted the role as a public watchdog.

  • UNI TAVUR AND MEDIA EDUCATION AT UPNG
    By David Robie
    Uni Tavur, the award-winning journalism training newspaper at the University of Papua New Guinea is the only newspaper in the South Pacific to have an 'editorial charter'. The paper also observes the Charter of Student Press Rights under the United Nations Convention on Freedom of Information.

  • TAUIWI AND MAORI MEDIA: THE INDIGENOUS VIEW
    By Ian Stuart
    Aotearoa/New Zealand is divided between the mainstream news media and the fast-growing Maori media with different perspectives. New Zealand journalism graduates need to be taught different media systems and news values.

  • RADIO WARS IN PNG: NAUFM'S TOUGH STRUGGLE
    By Raphael Semel
    While NauFM goes from strength-to-strength, its established rival Radio Kalang has been on the verge of collapse. However, clouding NauFM's silver lining are serious questions about the quality and style of its news and information programs.

  • CENSORSHIP IN MALAWI
    By Fr Trevor Cullen
    Malawi is an example of the utter extremes of press censorship. It never experienced press freedom until 1993. The Malawi people are still bitter after three decades of Banda's rule. The people's new experience in press freedom has given them their first taste of democracy.

  • INDONESIAN MISADVENTURE * Graphic
    By Eyal Press
    West Papuan tribesmen take on the operations of Freeport McMoran, the company that runs the world's largest goldmine and third-largest copper mine. The lessons for Papua New Guinea's resource developers are sobering.

  • MELANESIA IRKS MALAYSIA
    By Alex Choong
    Malaysia's Primary Industries Minister Datuk Seti Dr Lim Keng Yaik, disturbed by attacks by environmentalists on companies from his country for overlogging, led a two-week forestry mission to PNG, Solomon Islands and Vanuatu in early 1996 to have a first-hand look.

  • THE PARADISE CONSPIRACY: TROPICAL HEAT
    By Ian Wishart
    A death, missing computer disks, a winebox full of secret files, a tax haven in the Cook islands, alleged extortion, arms dealing, corruption, coverups and criminal fraud, billion dollar deals, kidnap attempts ... and an investigative television team's struggle to expose the truth.

    CARTOONISTS:

  • CAMPION OHASIO
    Solomons Voice

    1996 PACIFIC INVESTIGATIVE JOURNALISM AWARD:

  • WHAT THE JUDGES SAID
    By the judges
    Sponsored by the South Pacific Centre for Communication and Information in Development (SPCenCIID), the new annual Pacific Investigative Journalism Award has been established to promote higher standards in investigative reporting and to foster good relationships between journalists.
    1997 award deadline March 31.
    1996 winner: Yashwant Gaunder: The failings of the National Bank of Fiji.
    Commended: Dominic Kakas Malaysian logger linked to PNG forest minister's housing.
    Commended: Ilaitia Turagabeci Marijuana village in the Rakiraki highlands of Fiji.

    PROFILES IN MEDIA:

  • DOMINIC KAKAS
    By Lynne Amepou

  • NANCY HILLARY
    By Paula Kari

Forum

  • The Far North/South Pacific Connection
    Lael Morgan

  • Richardson dies in Suva
    The Review

  • Political correctness
    Alan Robson

  • Questions or silence?
    Rhonda Eva

Reviews

Index by author

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